July282014
jovaline:


This be the tale of how I bring the cure to all the Nighted States, save every poory children, brief for life. 

If you guys in the UK haven’t picked up The Country of Ice Cream Star yet, go to the book store right now. GO.

jovaline:

This be the tale of how I bring the cure to all the Nighted States, save every poory children, brief for life. 

If you guys in the UK haven’t picked up The Country of Ice Cream Star yet, go to the book store right now. GO.

(via spx)

7PM
July272014
July262014
rhamphotheca:

The cock-eyed squid, Histioteuthis heteropsis, gets its name from the different sized eyes it has. It is thought that the larger eye is specialized to detect bioluminescence. The spots all over the squid’s skin are photophores - or light organs - perhaps used to mask its silhouette from predators and prey.
You can download more free wallpapers like this from the Monterey Bay Aquarium: here 
(via: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)

rhamphotheca:

The cock-eyed squid, Histioteuthis heteropsis, gets its name from the different sized eyes it has. It is thought that the larger eye is specialized to detect bioluminescence. The spots all over the squid’s skin are photophores - or light organs - perhaps used to mask its silhouette from predators and prey.

You can download more free wallpapers like this from the Monterey Bay Aquarium: here

(via: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)

10PM
rhamphotheca:

SCIENCE/AAAS:  VANISHING FAUNA
Science's special section on vanishing fauna addresses the widely accepted issue that human activity is speeding the demise of many animal species through the destruction of wild lands, the consumption of animals as resources or luxuries, and the persecution of species that humans view as threats or competitors—but the socio-economic drivers of this defaunation can be complex.
This special section highlights Earth’s disappearing animals as well as the complications that arise when humans try to conserve them…
Defaunation in the Anthropocene
Reversing defaunation: Restoring species in a changing world
The empty forest
An animal-rich future
Wildlife decline and social conflict…
(Read the papers here)

rhamphotheca:

SCIENCE/AAAS:  VANISHING FAUNA

Science's special section on vanishing fauna addresses the widely accepted issue that human activity is speeding the demise of many animal species through the destruction of wild lands, the consumption of animals as resources or luxuries, and the persecution of species that humans view as threats or competitors—but the socio-economic drivers of this defaunation can be complex.

This special section highlights Earth’s disappearing animals as well as the complications that arise when humans try to conserve them…

  • Defaunation in the Anthropocene
  • Reversing defaunation: Restoring species in a changing world
  • The empty forest
  • An animal-rich future
  • Wildlife decline and social conflict…

(Read the papers here)

10PM
sillyferret:

The most amazing button ever.

sillyferret:

The most amazing button ever.

(via plannedparenthood)

10PM
“Everything that can be invented has been invented.” Charles Holland Duell, United States Commissioner of Patents, 1898-1901 (via thelearningbrain)
July242014
July212014
8PM
kqedscience:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists"When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.
Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.”

Learn more from NPR.

kqedscience:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

"When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.”
Learn more from NPR.

(via diy)

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